Rrrrrridges

Swatch Lisette has ridges.  Bitch.  What the hell am I talking about.  When I knit stockinette flat, I get ridges because my knit and purl rows have different tension.  I think I purl too loose.  You know, loose purls sink ships.  Is my only alternative to purl with an even SMALLER needle?  Please don’t tell me that…

My swatch aka the back of Lisette, is knit flat and must be knit flat because of the garter side and front panels.  I’ve been knitting since the year one and it seems that I should be able to knit some decent stockinette flat.  The aforementioned ridges are most pronounced when knitting with tiny needles (2s in this case) and sproingy smallish yarn (the lovely Rowan 4 ply Soft).  What’s a girl to do?  Any suggestions…

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9 responses

  1. I have recently noticed the same thing happening with my stockingette stitch. After years of nice even tension. I guess us girls in our 40s get looser with age! 🙂 But I’m open to suggestions on how to “fix” it!

  2. Well, I always purl with a one size smaller needle when knitting flat because I ALWAYS get ridges. You could try the wacky “combined knitting” over on Annie Modesitt’s site — that is the other common solution to this.

  3. Two suggestions:
    1) combined knitting
    2) wet blocking
    I’ve had the same problem on occasion and have found that in different situations, different solutions work…
    good luck!
    Jessie

  4. Get a copy of Mary Thomas’ knitting book. There’s a chapter in which she goes over the different combinations of knitting and purling–you know, has to do with which way your loops lie on the needle, whether you go through the front or back of the loop, etc. Try all the combinations (there are at least 4) until you find the fabric that pleases you. I got so frustrated with my stockinette at one point that I made a huge swatch until I drilled into my brain and fingers the combination that gives me the least variation between knit and purl stitches.

  5. I had ridgey stockinette until I switched to knitting Continental style. Now it’s all the same, round or flat, no ridges.

  6. Not wishing to seem overly simplistic, but I solved this very irritating problem by tightening my tension on purl rows. When I pay attention, it looks good. Every once in awhile I don’t and it doesn’t! By now it’s habit.

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