Springing forward one skirt at a time

Flowers in the garden.

In an effort to spring-ify my life out of the winter doldrums, I thought I’d begin at the sewing machine.  I’ve got to clean out the house to make room for a visitor who will be staying for months, and that motivated me to look to the stash when project pondering.

I’d bought rather too much fabric in New York a few months ago, all with no master plan.  Much of it turned out to be floral and two pieces are border prints and one is a borderline border print.  Confession time:  I’ve never worked with border prints before and kind of had to go with my best judgement regarding pattern placement.

Burda 7652:  It’s out of print, so here’s the line drawing.

Lack of knowledge aside, I wanted to use some very vintage looking cotton floral border print from B&J Fabrics (which is an amazing store btw).  My thought was some pleats and A-line.  A fully pleated cotton skirt on the cross grain wouldn’t be the most flattering so I found Burda 7652 (out of print so there’s the line drawing for your edification) marinating in my stash.  It’s an A-line skirt silhouette with sewn down front pleats, plain A-line back and a yoke.  That yoke and sewn pleat look should minimize the damage I’ve caused my tummy from the latest batch of Lemon Yogurt Cake with icing, which makes for a tasty breakfast (and lunch and linner).

Can you see the flowers peeking out at the waistband?

Fabric-wise I didn’t have enough fabric to make the front faux sewn placket (which is kind of weird anyway since it’s not functional if you sew it up their way) so I folded the pattern at the center front and just placed that on the fold and pretended like it was supposed to be that way.  That worked fine.  I also had to turn the back pattern pieces off grain to make the florals be at the same level at the side seams.  That made the side and center back seams off grain and more unstable (read wobbly).

The top of the yoke has a few flowers peeking out, but the print made it impossible to get the yoke plain black.  It looks kind of cute so I’ll pretend I meant for it to be that way.  A jaunty hint of flowers peeking out!

Other than remove the faux front placket, I made the skirt as written.  The pattern is excellent, as one would expect of a Burda pattern.  There is no excessive ease to account for so you can just measure yourself and make the right size with a minimum of fuss.   I stabilized the top of yoke and pocket openings with stay tape (via Sandra Betzina’s tips).  I used plain black voile for the pocket lining and yoke facings and HAND SEWED it to the yoke.  Turns out that Pam Howard’s “The Classic Tailored Shirt” has converted me to a bit of hand sewing.  That and getting “sewing glasses” from the eye doctor.  My insurance pays for glasses every other year but I didn’t need new ones (for driving) this year so I asked about close sewing work and the awesome doc said “no problem”.  So I’ve got sewing glasses that work just great for close work, but make me queasy when looking at anything else.  Well, there you go.

So spring is here in my skirt, a riot of flowers that I can only imagine in a garden since we have no water to grow such things.  Isn’t it ironic that most of you are buried under mounds of snow and we have water restrictions?  If only we could balance that a bit.  Next up I’ve planned another skirt, and to be different it’s black and A-line.  Hey, I know what I like and wear!  Plus I’ve got to use up some stash before April!

Pleat detail.

6 responses

  1. That’s a great pattern, a fab basic with some nice details in the pockets, yoke and pleats. The skirt is lovely and I think the black background makes it wearable most of the year too – bright but not too summer-y

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